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2010 SYTACom Annual Research Workshop

On Monday, May 10, 2010, SYTACom will host its annual Research Workshop at McGill University.

This year's workshop will feature invited talks by industry participants, technical presentations by international researchers, a poster session and a student research competition.



STUDENT RESEARCH COMPETITION: Please note that the deadline to register and submit slides for the research competition has been extended until May 6, 2010.

Once again, the workshop will feature a student research presentation contest that is open to all SYTACom students.

Format: This contest will test your presentation skills and your ability to quickly and concisely convince an audience. You will have 3 minutes (not a second more!) to convince the audience (all Electrical Engineers, but maybe not in your field) of the importance and innovative character of your research. The audience will then vote on the best presentations. Powerpoint slides are allowed, as well as any props you deem appropriate, as long as no setup time is required.

Contest rules:

  1. Participants will each have 3 minutes to talk. A timer will ensure that the time limit is respected.
  2. Participants who use power point slides MUST send their slides via email to the SYTACom office (maru.basanez@mcgill.ca) NO LATER THAN MAY 6, 2010
  3. A maximum of 15 entrants will be accepted on a first come first served basis
  4. Please note that the language of presentation should be English – audience may include international researchers, as well as researchers from outside of Quebec.

PRIZES:

  1. 37" HDTV
  2. PSP Go
  3. Blu Ray disc player

This year’s workshop will also feature a non-judged poster session. You are invited to submit contributions to this poster session, in all areas covered by the SYTACom mandate.

PLEASE NOTE THAT THE POSTER SESSION IS NOT A COMPETITION.
It is intended as a forum to showcase recent research results. Poster boards will be available at the workshop.

Please send your poster information (title, authors, affiliation and 100-word abstract) to maru.basanez@mcgill.ca

Deadline for 100-word abstract submission: May 3, 2010

10:00 – 10:15 Opening Remarks
Trottier 0100
David Plant, Director, SYTACom
Michel Dumoulin, Vice-Président, FRQNT
10:15 – 10:45 Invited Talk
Trottier 0100
HSPA in Remote Communities – A sustainable model
Jason Neale, OmniGlobe
10:45 - 11:15 Invited Talk
Trottier 0100
Mobile Broadband (MBB): Meeting the Challenge of 900x Capacity Demand for Next Decade
Wen Tong, Huawei
11:15 - 11:30 Coffee Break
Trottier upper mezzanine
(2nd fl)
 
11:30 - 12:00 Invited Talk
Trottier 0100
100 Gb/s and beyond
Kim Roberts, Ciena
12:00 - 12:30 Invited Talk
Trottier 0100
On Publishing in IEEE Journals
Prof. Vijay Bhargava, University of British Columbia
12:30 - 14:00 Buffet Lunch
Trottier upper mezzanine
(2nd fl)
 
14:00 – 15:00 Technical Presentation
Trottier 2100
Ubiquitous Networks
Prof. Guixia Kang, Beijing University of Posts and Telecommunications
14:00 – 15:00 Technical Presentation
Trottier 2110
Mitigation of exposed terminals problem in 802.11 networks with differential capture capable receivers
Prof. Swades De, IIT Delhi
15:00 - 15:15 Coffee Break
Trottier upper mezzanine
(2nd fl)
 
15:15 - 17:00 Student Research Competition
Trottier 2100
 
15:15 - 17:00 Poster Session
Trottier upper mezzanine
(2nd fl)
 

ABSTRACTS

HSPA in Remote Communities – A sustainable model
Jason Neale, OmniGlobe

ABSTRACT: Deployment of data or cellular telephony services in remote and rural regions of developed countries, as well as many areas of developing countries, is both technically difficult and cost-prohibitive.

HSPA in remote communities is the sustainable answer, as it combines Voice and Data on the same low cost platform. With the bundle of services cross subsidizing each other, making remote community communications viable.

The talk will give an overview of the challenges in delivering communications in remote areas, which differ from the those in cities, and range from logistics and shipping through to creating a profitable business. Often, although challenging, the technology difficulties are insignificant compared to ensuring equipment is sitting on a dock for a 3 month shipping time to the far North!

The optimal technology solution for delivering services to remote communities will also be discussed. Financial models, showing the impact of high or low take-up will also be shown. Overall, the talk will give an A to Z example of how to deliver services in remote communities.

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100 Gb/s and beyond
Kim Roberts, Ciena

ABSTRACT: Moving beyond 10 Gb/s per optical signal led to the introduction of two key elements. First, intensity modulation was replaced by alternate modulation approaches that yield both improved spectral efficiency and increased noise tolerance. Second, a new type of optical receiver was introduced that makes use of coherent mixing of the signal carrier with an optical local oscillator. When coupled with digital signal processing, implemented in low cost CMOS technology, this coherent receiver provides a low cost way to mitigate optical impairments and recover data from the more complex transmission symbols. Today, transmission systems employing advanced modulation formats and coherent receivers with channel rates of 40 Gb/s are widely deployed. The first commercial 100 Gb/s system using this approach was put into service in late 2009. These methods are poised now to attack the next order of magnitude, towards Tb/s optical channels.

This presentation provides an overview of the technical approaches used in the latest generation of commercial high capacity transmission systems and show how these approaches will be extended to build even higher capacity systems in the future.

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On Publishing in IEEE Journals
Prof. Vijay Bhargava, University of British Columbia

ABSTRACT: The IEEE Publishes about twenty five percent of the Global research in the electro technology area. However the impact of the IEEE Publications is more like eighty percent judging by the citations in patent applications and scholarly publications. In recent years there has been a substantial increase in the number of submissions to the IEEE journals, particularly from Asia and the Asia Pacific. The number of papers published by researchers from Canada is reasonable but is not commensurate with the high caliber research as evidenced by the quality of papers at this workshop. In this light hearted presentation we suggest ways to increase this and some caution to be exercised.

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Ubiquitous Networks
Prof. Guixia Kang, Beijing University of Posts and Telecommunications

Abstract: Since year 2009, especially after the grandios blueprint of "Sensing China" proposed by Chinese Premier, Wen Jiabao, in August 2009, the R&D works and academic activities concerning Wireless Sensor Networks, the Networks of Internet of Things, as well as Ubiquitous Networks are continually warming up in the ICT industry in China.

This presentation is to give an overview of ubiquitous networks, including the concept, the key research points, the recent Chinese academic activities, etc., are introduced.

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Mitigation of exposed terminals problem in 802.11 networks with differential capture capable receivers
Prof. Swades De, IIT Delhi

ABSTRACT: It is well-known that in a homogeneous 802.11 ad hoc network with distributed control, hidden/exposed terminals exist even with physical and virtual carrier sensing. There have been several variants of proposed solutions in the literature without and with power control. In our recent work, we are aiming at mitigating the hidden/exposed terminals problem by exploiting differential capture capable radio receivers.

In this presentation, we will first show that, by accounting the differential capture capability of radio receivers, the carrier sense range of a wireless node in 802.11 networks can be reduced, thereby abating the exposed terminals problem and hence aiding to the network throughput with little or no negative impact on fairness performance. To further increase the spatial reuse, we will discuss our proposed liberal carrier sensing scheme that helps identify some of the exposed prospective receivers by using some already available local information and allow them to initiate secondary sessions. We will then address the added challenges on network performance when the nodes are allowed distributed transmit power control. We will present our proposed cross-layer protocol solution to eliminate/alleviate hidden/exposed terminals. Finally, we will outline our ongoing work on combining the power control protocol solution and differential capture capability of radio receivers for improved network performance.

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